"There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so"
Shakespeare



My Top Five Books For 2018

As 2018 winds down, here are my top five books for the year. These are the most insightful books I’ve read this year; they are listed in no particular order.

Principles: Life and Work

This book is a brain dump of Ray Dalio’s principles on running his company. It can be a bit dry at times, as Ray Dalio goes through his various principles, listing and describing them one at a time. I found his principles on life, earlier in the book, and his principles on management, later in the book to be the most insightful.

He started Bridgewater Associates in 1975 in his own home. As he grew the company to be one of the top five hedge funds in the U.S, he has been through many failures in business, including a period where he had to fire many of his employees. These failures helped him develop various principles to hold him and everyone in his company accountable, and to prevent them from repeating the same mistakes.

As he begins to step down from his role as CEO, he wanted to leave his employees with his vision for running Bridgewater, and the reasoning behind his principles. Hence, he wrote this book with his employees in mind, but also as a way to share his ideas with the world.

The book mainly contains the principles, and rules that Ray developed to guide him through his personal life while running his hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates. He delves into his financial principles briefly, i.e on investing in markets, but has another book dedicated entirely to understanding the economy.

Thinking, Fast and Slow

This book gives a really good framework to understand the way the human mind works. It starts with the story of two psychologists who questioned the conventional wisdom...

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Notes on, Principles Life and Work

This book is a brain dump of Ray Dalio’s principles on running his company. It can be a bit dry at times, as Ray Dalio goes through his various principles, listing and describing them one at a time. I found his principles on life, earlier in the book, and his principles on management, later in the book to be the most insightful.

He started Bridgewater Associates in 1975 in his own home. As he grew the company to be one of the top five hedge funds in the U.S, he has been through many failures in business, including a period where he had to fire many of his employees. These failures helped him develop various principles to hold him and everyone in his company accountable, and to prevent them from repeating the same mistakes.

As he begins to step down from his role as CEO, he wanted to leave his employees with his vision for running Bridgewater, and the reasoning behind his principles. Hence, he wrote this book with his employees in mind, but also as a way to share his ideas with the world.

The book mainly contains the principles, and rules that Ray developed to guide him through his personal life while running his hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates. He delves into his financial principles briefly, i.e on investing in markets, but has another book dedicated entirely to understanding the economy.

Here are some of my key takeaways from the book.

Pain + Reflection = Progress

Ray’s principles are developed through his various failures, and he urges the reader to do the same, to constantly reflect on their failures, and use these failures to develop principles and processes, to boost them on an upward spiral. He has a great graph that shows how someone should conduct their personal/professional...

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